The path from Miss Widi’s science class to UTS.

Outstanding Graduate award winner Venny was inspired by her high school teacher.
Outstanding Graduate award winner Venny was inspired by her high school teacher.

Venny Angela’s interest in science began when she was at high school in Jakarta. Inspired by her science teacher, Miss Widi, she had chosen science as her major and developed a love of biology. “Miss Widi was a very good teacher,” she says. “I really liked how she explained everything. It all made sense, and she always taught us in an interesting way – a very interactive way.” Living through a pandemic has only increased Venny’s interest. She says, “We need more scientists to study this disease, and other diseases that have no cure.”
 
A good foundation for a science career
When Venny was looking for her next step after high school, a friend introduced her to UTS. After investigating online, she decided it was the right place for her. “I was attracted because I thought it would give me more opportunities, and a good foundation for my science career,” she says.
 
Now studying Bachelor of Science (majoring in Biotechnology) at UTS, Venny began her study pathway with a Diploma of Science at UTS College. Although she wanted to study on campus, borders were still closed, so she completed it from her home in Jakarta. She says, “One of the positives of studying online was learning to focus. I learnt a lot about how to manage things, especially my time. Now that I’m at UTS, I realise that UTS College helped me a lot.”
 
Hard work rewarded
Venny was so successful at UTS College that she won the Outstanding Graduate award – a cash prize for attaining the highest grade-point-average in her diploma group. “I’m really happy about the prize,” she says. “It feels like UTS College gave me a reward for working hard. I didn’t expect this, and I’m very grateful. I called my mother first when I got the news and were so excited that we just congratulated each other.”
 
The other good news she received was that Australia’s borders were reopening in time for her to join the second year of her Bachelor of Science on campus at UTS. “I’m so grateful for that,” she says. “I’ve already met a lot of friends here from my diploma here in Sydney. I’ve been waiting to meet them in person and it’s so lovely.”
 
Getting involved
She was also looking forward to participating in the lively UTS community. She says, “I love how there are so many societies at UTS, and I joined quite a few. I joined the Biotechnology Society because it’s related to my major, and the UTS College Alumni Club. I joined the UTS Dance Society because I love to dance – I like hip-hop dance. I also joined a volunteering program called The Big Lift. They have a big event every July where we go on a road trip to help people by doing service projects in regional communities.”
 
A smooth transition
Venny’s transition to UTS has been very smooth and she says her experiences at UTS College have helped her feel well-prepared. She says, “UTS College helped me a lot. It’s been a good foundation for my degree at UTS. I feel like I know what I’m doing. I wasn’t a very organised person before, but now I make lists of what I have to do, and I have a well-structured study path. I learnt about preparation from UTS College. I also got to understand the theory for my science studies.”
 
When she has finished her degree, Venny hopes to commence her science career in Australia and is considering her options. “I’m still interested in biotechnology and medical science. Scientists are still working so hard because of the pandemic. But I’m also interested in food biotech,” she says. “Hopefully I can help a lot of people through my science career.”
 
Believe in what you’re doing
Self-belief is important to Venny. She says, “I think if you have the will to do something, you can do it. You will eventually do it. I think about when I first had my dream to study, and I remember my purpose. I remind myself why I’m doing this.” It’s a way of thinking she recommends to other students. “Believe in what you’re doing,” she says, “If you have any difficulties, you can reach out to your teachers. You don’t need to feel overwhelmed. Remember, other students are probably feeling the same. And make sure you socialise because nobody can study all the time. Sometimes you just need to dance.”